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Papel Picado Screenprinting

Papel Picado Screenprinting with Angel Jesus Perez

This is an all-levels workshop where participants will learn the basics of screenprinting and image making through the art of papel picado, a traditional Mexican art form using hand cut paper stencils. Participants will spend time learning how to make fine and intricate cuts into paper and experiment with different methods of creating compositions to be exposed on screens and printed. This workshop will also introduce the basics of color mixing and color theory using screenprinting ink and transparent base. All are welcome!

Accessibility – This class takes place in the Heinz Printmaking Studio (located on the third floor) and requires participants to climb two flights of stairs as there is no elevator access. Please email classes@kala.org regarding any  accessibility needs prior to enrolling so we can assess if we are able to accommodate you safely and efficiently.

  • Tuition: $410
  • Location: Heinz Printmaking Studio
  • Instructor: Angel Jesus Perez
  • 1 Classes
  • Sunday, October 31, 2024 — December 5, 2024
  • 6:00PM — 9:00PM
  • TBD - Payable to the instructor on the first day

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About the Instructor:

Angel Jesus Perez is a Chicano Printmaker and mural artist from Washington D.C., based in Oakland. Growing up in D.C., Angel’s Chicano culture was mostly accessible through books, art, and museum visits. In 2011 Angel left D.C to Study Printmaking at California College of the Arts in Oakland, and worked as a mural artist and teacher for various non-profit arts organizations in the Bay Area for more than 10 years. Printmaking has become Angel’s true way to express himself in a boundless realm of creativity. Angel enjoys working with the many different color processes of relief, etching , screen printing and lithography. His printmaking style is intricate and tells many stories within a print. Most of his work is inspired by Chicano murals, Black murals, pre-Columbian art, African art and more importantly the local murals he grew up admiring in Washington D.C.