kala art institute

current exhibitions:

Courtney Sennish

Courtney Sennish

Nelleke Beltjens

Nelleke Beltjens

Kazuko Watanabe

Kazuko Watanabe

Wioleta Kaminska

Wioleta Kaminska

Indira Martina Morre

Indira Martina Morre

The Bureau of Linguistical Reality

The Bureau of Linguistical Reality

Hannah Skoonberg

Hannah Skoonberg

Young Suh & Katie Peterson

Young Suh & Katie Peterson

Jiajun Wang

Jiajun Wang

Fermata

May 19 – July 1, 2016

Opening Reception: Thursday, May 19, 6-8pm

Gallery Talk: Thursday, June 23, 7pm

Nelleke Beltjens
Wioleta Kaminska
Indira Martina Morre
Hannah Skoonberg
Courtney Sennish
Young Suh & Katie Peterson
The Bureau of Linguistical Reality (Alicia Escott & Heidi Quante)
Jiajun Wang
Kazuko Watanabe

Exhibition Sponsors:
Meyer Sound

Meyer Sound     

Gallery Hours: Tue-Fri, 12-5:00pm; Sat, 12-4:30pm

Gallery location:
2990 San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94702
510-841-7000

Kala Gallery is looking forward to the opening of Fermata on Thursday, May 19, 6-8pm.

The exhibition Fermata presents artists who explore the psychological disjunction in our contemporary life caused by its fast pace and rapid changes, such as disconnections between mind and information, body and image, reason and result, and what is real and what we believe is real, and more.

Musical notation fermata indicates prolongation of the time value of a note or rest at the performer’s discretion. Without a fermata, our mind might not catch up with the progression of music. Our information driven society continuously feeds us data. How do we process this feed in real time? We search many things online: places to travel, partners to meet, things to buy, pets to adopt, apartments to live, but there are disconnections between expectations formulated by online searches and real life experiences. Receiving so much information in such a short time, we are losing mental room to formulate coherent ideas, construct memories and/or create connections between fantasy and reality.

The exhibition Fermata investigates notions of psychological attachment and detachment, ideas of time, patience and impatience, speed of life, alternative approaches to handle information, and more.

Nelleke Beltjens’ drawings speak of the idea of movement and interruption. Her drawings present “the state of becoming”, yet this flow is continually interrupted by her practice of cutting paper. This process creates a unique resonance, which echoes with what’s left on her drawings. “These interruptions… may turn things upside down, or inside out, or even pause, only to continue anew until interrupted again.”

Wioleta Kaminska presents her video landscapes - visual reflection on the intersection between nature, technology and culture in contemporary life. Her video pieces invite the audience to slow down, contemplate perception of time passing and reflect on how we navigate spaces both physically and virtually.

Indira Martina Morre’s painting series called Password: Sign Disintegration is a contemplative allegory about psychological shifts in a technology-driven, information-dependent society. Her paintings complicate these ideas with images that are suggestive of naturally occurring shapes and patterns in dialog with shapes generated from the human-produced, artificial world. The symbols on her computer disintegrate on her canvas to become a psychological map, a hand-made network of a presence in time.

Hannah Skoonberg’s work seeks the feeling of a thought or a word almost remembered. Her cut paper work with photographic process explores the intersection between man-made landscapes and organic plant forms. Her objects become containers that hold memories, or in-between places that describe a real space in a fragile ephemeral way while the surfaces describe a both chaotic and domestic emotional state.

In search of illuminations and silent monuments, Courtney Sennish’s sculptures examine the urban landscape by isolating and focusing on specific moments and objects found through her everyday pilgrimage. Her works are created through accumulation of labor, historical research and intuition, telling stories of history, landscape, and geography.

Photographer Young Suh & writer Katie Peterson present their collaborative video pieces in Fermata. Sharing the same interest in landscape and also reflecting their difference in languages and artistic media, they examine how we live together in our rapidly changing world, touching on human struggles within it and between different individuals.

The Bureau of Linguistical Reality is a participatory social practice performance and they recognize a collective loss for words to describe phenomena and emotions in contemporary life. Established by Alicia Escott and Heidi Quante, The Bureau of Linguistical Realitycreates new words together with participants and uses them as points of connectivity to initiate or further conversations around topics that are difficult to discuss or even conceptualize.

Jiajun Wang turns the domestic environment into his semi-theatrical stage. He directs his family as actors, asking them “who they were to him?” and then captures theatrical stills reflecting family narratives, gender roles, the one-child policy in China, and the distance both physically and mentally between himself and his loved ones.

For Kazuko Watanabe, the process of printmaking became an important method for her to remember memories, deepen thoughts, and mark time. Each plate in Mapping the Trace responds to a significant action and time in her life and for this iteration she presents the accumulated seventy copper plates side by side with the finished print. Her book piece Soaring Skies also contemplates evolving thoughts throughout her life using ever-changing skies as a metaphor of things that never remain the same.



Tours of the Kala studio, gallery and print archive are also available by appointment.

For more information, contact Mayumi Hamanaka, Kala Gallery Curator, mayumi@kala.org or (510) 841-7000 ex 201.

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